Residency Training

Most residents will fulfill the Royal College academic training requirements through the Master of Health Science (MHSc) or Master of Public Health (MPH) degree programs in their first year of residency training. Note that the MPH may take longer than one academic year to complete. Prior to starting either program, courses required for the Public Health & Preventive Medicine Residency Program should be discussed with the Program Director.

The MHSc and MPH degrees are completed during the UBC academic year starting September 1st. As the residents' year is usually July 1 to June 30, the first two months of that year are spent in a Field Rotation.

All residents in a postgraduate degree program must be enrolled in and meet the requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies including the payment of required fees. The applicant should be aware that tuition fees are not covered by the program or waived by UBC.

Residents entering the program directly from Medical School will enter into the academic year of the residency and will complete their Master of Health Science or Public Health. Following the Masters degree, there are two possibilities for clinical training. Residents can do one basic clinical year or obtain certification with the Canadian College of Family Physicians via the UBC Family Practice Residency – two years of clinical training. Please contact the Public Health & Preventive Medicine Residency Program Director regarding this possibility. The final decision for location of clinical training is made by the PGY-1 Coordinating Office or the Associate Dean of Postgraduate Education.

Field rotations are intended to provide residents with a breadth and scope of public health practice. Please see this list of UBC Public Health & Preventive Medicine Residency Field Rotations. The rotations have Public Health & Preventive Medicine specific objectives to ensure the Royal College objectives are achieved. Additional objectives may be negotiated between Field Rotation supervisors and residents with assistance from the Program Director.

The core field rotations include a minimum of 3 months in each of two Regional Health Authorities (one rural and one urban), 3 months in Environmental Health, 3 months in Communicable Disease Control, 2 months in Aboriginal Health and 2 months in Occupational Health. The content of further field training in the remaining allocated time is a balance between meeting Royal College educational objectives and developing the residents’ capabilities with respect to their career interests. In general, rotations are at least 3 months in duration.

Six months of training in an unaccredited setting is conditionally permitted by the Royal College, conditional on the approval of the Program Director. Examples of elective rotations include international health with UNICEF or the Canadian International Development Agency, and aerospace medicine at the Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine.

The Royal College accepts up to one year of the Canadian Federal Field Epidemiology Program as a field placement.

Two examples of residency training are given schematically below:

PGY
Month
July
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
March
April
May
June
1
Introductory Rotation
MHSc or MPH Training
Elective
2
Family Practice
3
Family Practice
4
Occupational Health
Elective
Communicable Disease Control
Urban Health Authority
Rural Health Authority
5
Rural Health
Aboriginal Health
Elective
Environmental Health
Elective
PGY
Month
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
March
April
May
June
July
Aug
3
MHSc or MPH degree
Elective
Aboriginal Health
4
Elective or MPH completion
Urban Health Authority
Communicable Disease Control
Rural Health Authority
5
Elective
Environmental Health
Occupational Health
Elective

Residents are expected to attend SPPH 570/710 each Friday afternoon at the School of Population and Public Health. This is a formal course designed to cover important content areas in Public Health & Preventive Medicine and develops proficiencies in oral and written skills to prepare residents for their Fellowship examinations. Residents may also be asked to attend occasional meetings or other Public Health & Preventive Medicine events on Friday mornings. Those engaged in Graduate Studies at SPPH are required to attend weekly Grand Rounds each Friday morning during the Academic Year.

A typical Academic Half Day is as follows:

1:00 pm to 2:00 pm Journal Club – A resident-led discussion on either a current issue in public health, a review of public health content in a priority journal or a formal review and critique of a recent research publication of public health relevance.
2:00 pm to 3:00 pm A resident will present on the assigned topic for the day, drawing from primary course textbooks and commonly-used reports or frameworks as developed by public health agencies.
3:00 pm to 4:00pm A presentation and discussion led by a guest-speaker who will speak to the practical applications of the topic in public health practice.

During the summer months residents may go on field trips during some Academic Half Days. Examples of such trips include visits to correctional centres, landfills, watersheds, abattoirs, and a port authority.

On Residents' Research Day, presentations are given by all residents who were in the program the previous year. Presenting gives residents experience and they receive feedback on their presentation and communication skills. Residents' Research Day usually occurs in November. Examples of presenters and their topics are listed in the table below:

Andrew Deonarine Geospatial Mapping of Epidemiological Data using R and Google Maps
Emily Newhouse Life expectancy inequities in Vancouver Coastal Health and the Downtown Eastside: Exploration through decomposition
Mark Lysyshyn Development of a framework for assessing risks related to public health emergencies at the Public Health Agency of Canada
John Omura The Descriptive Epidemiology of HIV infection in the Vancouver Coastal Health Region
Jason Wong Effectiveness of a Two Visit Hepatitis B Vaccination Schedule in the Urgent Traveller
Joanna Oda Experiences of burnout amongst family practice residents: a qualitative study

2013 Schedule